Separation of powers

DuaijRemnants of the Muslim Brotherhood, some members of parliament of the annulled majority and some of those who follow ex-MP Musallam Al-Barrak were able to get at the speaker of the house. They led a ferocious attack against Marzouq Al- Ghanem and the single-vote National Assembly, demanding that they condemn what they called in their tweets Iran’s occupation of Durra oilfield. Ghanem bowed to the banalities of Hirak (opposition movement) and Brotherhood and demanded an explanation from the government to tell the people the truth! Of course we do not blame Ghanem, as the campaign was ferocious, ‘patriotic’ and ‘sincere.’ Many of those with good intentions participated in it and joined the opposition in whipping the Assembly and its speaker.

The current Assembly, despite its lack of politicians and parliamentary professionals, has made many achievements, some of which previous assemblies were not able to do. The Assembly and its speaker should have continued the moderate national path and respected the separation of powers principles, and this is the constitutional principle, which the opposition of previous assemblies thrived on leaping over it. What happened is not the concern of the National Assembly, not in legislation or supervision, and it is noticed that the previous national assemblies placed all their attention on supervising the government’s performance and its policies to a point that they failed notably in legislation.

They made ‘prior’ supervision the basis, especially with regards to public funds-related allegations, to a point where development was hindered and projects were halted because opponents were claiming beforehand that there is theft or at least suspicion of public funds violation in them. It is not in the Assembly’s specialty to discuss the Iranian tender to explore oil in the Durra field, unless our assembly is Iranian.

The government handles this matter, and it announced its summoning of the Iranian representative and handed him Kuwait’s protest over the Iranian intentions – notice there are only ‘intentions.’ What is more possible for the government to do more than this, because so far, there is nothing other than the announcement about the intention to resume work in the field. Our government intervened immediately and drew the attention of the Iranian side to the agreements between the two countries, which stipulate informing Kuwait about any intention. This is all what the government can do at this time.

The Assembly’s intervention should be after the government fails in dealing with the matter or if it forfeits Kuwait’s rights. Our government is doing its job in a good manner so far, and deals with the Iranian side in a responsible and diplomatic way. So, we believe that Speaker Ghanem should not have intervened and fallen in the trap of the arrogance of ethnic and sectarian backwardness. — Translated by Kuwait Times

By Abdellatif Al-Duaij

This article was published on 31/08/2015